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Trellis installation for Monstera deliciosa

Trellis installation for Monstera deliciosa

Taming the Monstera

 Look closely among the mass of vines/aerial roots and you'll see a metal trellis holding it all together.

Look closely among the mass of vines/aerial roots and you'll see a metal trellis holding it all together.

I've been frequently asked about how I support my monstera so here are some details along with affiliate links to the products I'm using and enjoying.  Purchasing through these links goes to support this blog :)

Do I need to train my Monstera deliciosa?

Yes!  The growth pattern of the Monstera deliciosa is much like a pothos - vines that just keep getting longer.  For pothos, because of its smaller overall size, they can be left to hang off the side of the pot.  Since the monstera's natural size is much larger, a few vines hanging out of the pot would quickly fill an entire room!  Therefore, you should affix the vines to a sturdy trellis so they can grow upwards.

What about using a moss pole?

The idea of the moss pole is to provide a medium onto which the aerial roots can grip, just like they do in the wild.  The only problem with trying to accomplish this indoors is that you need to keep the moss moist at all times - this is not recommended as the air doesn't move as much as it does outside or in a nursery.  Stale air and constantly moist conditions are breeding grounds for mould/unwanted bacteria.

Even if you manage to keep the air fresh, a monstera's vine can be quite heavy.  A single post will not be as sturdy as a multi-post trellis.
 

The Metal Trellis

 The triangular shape of the trellis means there are three points of anchoring in the soil - very stable!

The triangular shape of the trellis means there are three points of anchoring in the soil - very stable!

The method I use for training my monstera vines is affixing them against a sturdy metal trellis like the Panacea Garden Ladder.  The triangular profile makes it much sturdier than a flat, fence-like design.

 The horizontal cross beams provide excellent support against the tendency of the vines to slip down.

The horizontal cross beams provide excellent support against the tendency of the vines to slip down.

Soft Rubber Ties

Although the monstera vine is quite tough, I find that twine or wires will eventually dig into the plant's flesh.  That's why I use these Soft Rubber Ties - they're strong, won't slip once you've twisted them against each other, and won't marr the plant.  They can be easily cut to whatever length you need.

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When your monstera is young, fresh from the nursery, the vines probably won't be hanging off the side of the pot for a few months.  Given good light and watering accordingly, those vines will seem to crawl outwards - this is the time to get them onto a trellis.

 When you first tie up the vines, the leaves will seem to face awkwardly in all directions.  Don't worry about this!  In time, the newer leaves will sort themselves out by orienting towards the light source(s).  My monstera has been trellised like this for 3 years.

When you first tie up the vines, the leaves will seem to face awkwardly in all directions.  Don't worry about this!  In time, the newer leaves will sort themselves out by orienting towards the light source(s).  My monstera has been trellised like this for 3 years.

Click here for a video of me installing the trellis

I hope this has been helpful for all you Monstera deliciosa parents out there.  If you haven't already, feel free to read the full story of how I acquired and cared for my monstera.

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